Black Lives Matter mural in Martinez vandalized in viral video


The Metropolis of Martinez is within the nationwide highlight, after a video went viral exhibiting a lady portray over a Black Lives Matter mural.

The three phrases are sprawled throughout Court docket Road in downtown Martinez. The mural, and the group’s response to it, has develop into the discuss of the city and nation. On Saturday, volunteers spent the July 4th vacation portray the phrase on the road. Cellular phone video captured a lady portray over the mural inside an hour of it being accomplished.

Justin Gomez, organizer with Martizians for Black Lives, mentioned he obtained a metropolis allow for the mural.

“We have been very conscious that it might be vandalized,” Gomez mentioned. “I used to be extra so shocked at how brazen it was. That vandalism occurred an hour after we completed and we have been down right here moments later and we fastened it.”

Additionally on Saturday, a picture of a racial slur on a parking storage in Martinez was circulated on the app “Nextdoor.” A resident informed KTVU an officer paid for provides together with his personal cash and painted over the slur by the tip of the day.

On Sunday, officers arrested a person for pointing a gun at somebody on the mural web site, after he drove by and shouted, “all lives matter.”

Town is listening to from individuals throughout the nation. Vice Mayor Mark Ross mentioned the feedback have been each constructive and unfavourable.

“Making an attempt to alter one thing so necessary as this, and so ingrained as this, is just not going to be simple.” Ross mentioned. “There’s going to be some resistance to it, however what this has accomplished has provoked an immune response towards this virus we name racism.”

Phrases of assist at the moment are chalked across the BLM phrase. Gomez desires to the see the eye was motion.

“Phrases matter on the street, however phrases matter after they’re written for anti-racist insurance policies after they’re deconstructing white supremacy in our counties and communities,” Gomez mentioned. “It’s elevated the dialog about Black lives that we’re having right here in Martinez to a nationwide scale. I by no means thought this could occur with a public artwork set up in solidarity with our Black group.”



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Black Lives Matter: Can viral movies cease police brutality?


Photo montage of pictures of George Floyd

George Floyd’s demise won’t have prompted international outrage if it hadn’t been filmed. However do viral movies really cut back police abuse?

“They killed this man, bro. He was crying, telling them ‘I can not breathe.”https://www.bbc.com/”

For greater than 5 minutes Darnella Frazier rambled on Fb Dwell concerning the killing she had witnessed – repeating over and over that she had video proof.

A short while afterward that night time in late Might, Frazier uploaded a video of the demise of George Floyd – together with the eight minutes and 46 seconds through which Derek Chauvin pressured his knee onto his neck.

Had it not been for that video and different footage from bystanders, it is seemingly that Mr Floyd’s demise would by no means have sparked international outrage. However does that make viral movies, shot on the cellphone in your hand, an efficient examine on police abuse?

Picture copyright
Getty Photos

Why was this one totally different?

Darnella Frazier’s video was removed from the primary viral footage to doc police brutality.

In 2016, Philando Castile died after being shot by police in his car. Just like the demise of George Floyd, Mr Castile’s demise additionally occurred in Minnesota – in Falcon Heights, only a brief drive from Minneapolis. His girlfriend live-streamed the speedy aftermath on Fb, together with photographs of Castile’s lifeless physique within the driver’s seat.

The day earlier than, Alton Sterling was killed by two law enforcement officials outdoors a comfort retailer in Louisiana. Video proof filmed on a smartphone was posted on-line.

In 2014, footage captured occasions main as much as the deaths of Eric Garner in New York and Laquan McDonald in Chicago. The truth is, many cite the beating of Rodney King by Los Angeles law enforcement officials, captured on videotape in 1991, as one of many first “viral” police abuse movies – lengthy earlier than the social media period.

None of these occasions, nevertheless, sparked fairly the identical stage of world outrage because the footage of George Floyd.

Picture copyright
Getty Photos

Picture caption

Protest indicators on the streets of Minneapolis

Consultants put the impression of Floyd’s demise all the way down to the size of the video, mixed with the particular nature of its graphic content material.

“Whereas a gunshot could be very fast, it’s instantly traumatic and really simple for one to look away,” says Allissa Richardson, creator of Bearing Witness Whereas Black: African People, Smartphones, and the New Protest #Journalism.

“This video transfixed folks due to the callous nature of the killing coupled with the brazen nature of the police, who knew they have been being filmed and nonetheless did it anyway,” she says.

On-line activism

The Black Lives Matter movement began in 2013, and the deaths of Mr Garner and of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, sparked large protests the next yr.

However Ms Richardson says fairly than ushering in a model new type of activism, new expertise is just being deployed for a a lot older function.

She makes use of the time period “black witnessing” to elucidate how African People have traditionally tried to file injustices, courting again to the period of slavery in pre-Civil Warfare America, drawing inspiration from Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave who led America’s abolitionist motion. In his first autobiography, Douglass documented his experiences as a slave.

“When black individuals are selecting up their cell telephones, they are not simply recording within the improper place on the proper time,” she says. “They’re trying to attach, traditionally, dots between atrocities.”

Others notice the defensive nature of the cell phone.

“For African People, each encounter with a regulation enforcement officer is probably a life and demise scenario,” says medical psychologist Monnica Williams. “They movie these interactions for their very own safety.”

Watching the police

Within the wake of George Floyd’s killing, movies have additionally been utilized by activists to observe the policing of protests, usually in chaotic and complicated conditions.

When David Frost pressed file on his cellphone’s digicam throughout a protest on 31 Might, he thought the police had taken one other life.

“I wished as many individuals to see it [as possible],” he says. “I used to be six toes away … when he received shot.”

Mr Frost, a white man, began filming after 20-year-old Justin Howell, an African American, was shot within the head with a “less-lethal” bean bag munition in Austin, Texas. Within the video, protesters have been seen carrying the injured man in direction of police, in an try and get assist. Then police opened fireplace once more.

Picture copyright
David Frost/Twitter

Picture caption

David Frost’s video confirmed protesters carrying Justin Howell in direction of police.

Mr Howell suffered life-changing accidents consequently, together with mind harm and a fractured cranium. Mr Frost’s video was considered over 10 million occasions on Twitter, and was broadly lined by US media.

“It wasn’t till we had gotten virtually three million hits that the Austin Police Division even talked about something,” he says.

After the incident went viral, Austin police introduced they’d now not be utilizing bean bag munition for crowd management.

Justin’s brother, Josh Howell, informed BBC Trending: “The quickness with which the video unfold on social media actually added to the entire response.”

Hear extra about this story

Listen to Trending on the BBC World Service

Police filming

There isn’t a single database counting the variety of folks killed by police in America annually, however knowledge collected by the impartial analysis group Mapping Police Violence has discovered that on common almost 1,100 folks have been killed by police since 2013.

Whereas most are white, the useless are disproportionately African American: final yr they made up 24% of the whole regardless of being 13% of the American inhabitants.

Attorneys and activists say they’re seeing extra video proof in circumstances involving police brutality.

There’s a “large enhance,” within the variety of shoppers who’re coming in with filmed proof, says Tracey Brown, who heads the civil rights and police brutality group on the Cochran Agency in New York Metropolis.

That marks a change, she says, from the primary wave of Black Lives Matter protests. Then, many activists pushed the concept of police physique cams and dashcams mounted in police vehicles. However research present they have not led to a lower in police shootings or a rise in accountability.

“In lots of municipalities the law enforcement officials do not get charged,” Ms Brown says. She notes that in lots of locations, it is unimaginable to acquire disciplinary information which include, she says, “vital data when making an attempt to convey costs towards law enforcement officials”.

And simply because movies exist, it does not imply legal professionals or the general public are at all times in a position to see them.

“Police departments do not launch movies till you are nicely right into a legal prosecution or a civil lawsuit,” she says.

In a single notable case, dashcam footage exhibiting that Laquan McDonald was strolling away from Chicago officers when he received shot was kept under wraps for over a yr, till strain by activists and journalists succeeded in getting it into the general public area. Officer Jason Van Dyke was ultimately convicted of second-degree murder.

Ethan Zuckerman, director of the Heart for Civic Media on the MIT Media Lab, says neither police cameras nor bystander footage can actually be an efficient examine on abuse.

“Our authorized system provides a lot flexibility to the police to make use of violence in the middle of finishing up their duties,” he says.

“Imagery could matter so far as getting folks out into the streets, nevertheless it doesn’t matter so far as stopping police from utilizing violence within the first place.”

Picture copyright
Getty Photos

Picture caption

Activists at a Black Lives Matter rally in New York

What subsequent?

Darnella Frazier’s footage of George Floyd’s demise wasn’t the primary viral video documenting a police killing – nor was it the final. Whereas such movies could have restricted impression in really stemming violence, African People and others will proceed to doc abuses for causes past easy prevention.

“Black folks decide up their cell telephones to do two issues,” says Alissa Richardson, “to say to the one who is dying, ‘I can’t allow you to die alone’, and ‘I’ll carry the message ahead to your loved ones – as a result of I do know that no one would consider what occurred to you right here at this time.”https://www.bbc.com/”

Is there a narrative we ought to be investigating?

Observe us on Twitter @BBCtrending or on Facebook.





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Black Lives Matter: Can viral movies cease police brutality?


Photo montage of pictures of George Floyd

George Floyd’s dying won’t have precipitated international outrage if it hadn’t been filmed. However do viral movies truly cut back police abuse?

“They killed this man, bro. He was crying, telling them ‘I am unable to breathe.”https://www.bbc.com/”

For greater than 5 minutes Darnella Frazier rambled on Fb Reside in regards to the killing she had witnessed – repeating again and again that she had video proof.

A short while afterward that night time in late Might, Frazier uploaded a video of the dying of George Floyd – together with the eight minutes and 46 seconds wherein Derek Chauvin pressured his knee onto his neck.

Had it not been for that video and different footage from bystanders, it is probably that Mr Floyd’s dying would by no means have sparked international outrage. However does that make viral movies, shot on the cellphone in your hand, an efficient verify on police abuse?

Picture copyright
Getty Photos

Why was this one completely different?

Darnella Frazier’s video was removed from the primary viral footage to doc police brutality.

In 2016, Philando Castile died after being shot by police in his car. Just like the dying of George Floyd, Mr Castile’s dying additionally occurred in Minnesota – in Falcon Heights, only a quick drive from Minneapolis. His girlfriend live-streamed the fast aftermath on Fb, together with photographs of Castile’s lifeless physique within the driver’s seat.

The day earlier than, Alton Sterling was killed by two law enforcement officials outdoors a comfort retailer in Louisiana. Video proof filmed on a smartphone was posted on-line.

In 2014, footage captured occasions main as much as the deaths of Eric Garner in New York and Laquan McDonald in Chicago. The truth is, many cite the beating of Rodney King by Los Angeles law enforcement officials, captured on videotape in 1991, as one of many first “viral” police abuse movies – lengthy earlier than the social media period.

None of these occasions, nonetheless, sparked fairly the identical stage of world outrage because the footage of George Floyd.

Picture copyright
Getty Photos

Picture caption

Protest indicators on the streets of Minneapolis

Specialists put the impression of Floyd’s dying all the way down to the size of the video, mixed with the particular nature of its graphic content material.

“Whereas a gunshot could be very fast, it’s instantly traumatic and really straightforward for one to look away,” says Allissa Richardson, writer of Bearing Witness Whereas Black: African Individuals, Smartphones, and the New Protest #Journalism.

“This video transfixed folks due to the callous nature of the killing coupled with the brazen nature of the police, who knew they had been being filmed and nonetheless did it anyway,” she says.

On-line activism

The Black Lives Matter movement began in 2013, and the deaths of Mr Garner and of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, sparked large protests the next 12 months.

However Ms Richardson says moderately than ushering in a model new type of activism, new know-how is just being deployed for a a lot older goal.

She makes use of the time period “black witnessing” to clarify how African Individuals have traditionally tried to report injustices, courting again to the period of slavery in pre-Civil Battle America, drawing inspiration from Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave who led America’s abolitionist motion. In his first autobiography, Douglass documented his experiences as a slave.

“When black individuals are choosing up their cell telephones, they are not simply recording within the improper place on the proper time,” she says. “They’re making an attempt to attach, traditionally, dots between atrocities.”

Others word the defensive nature of the cell phone.

“For African Individuals, each encounter with a regulation enforcement officer is probably a life and dying state of affairs,” says scientific psychologist Monnica Williams. “They movie these interactions for their very own safety.”

Watching the police

Within the wake of George Floyd’s killing, movies have additionally been utilized by activists to observe the policing of protests, usually in chaotic and complicated conditions.

When David Frost pressed report on his cellphone’s digicam throughout a protest on 31 Might, he thought the police had taken one other life.

“I needed as many individuals to see it [as possible],” he says. “I used to be six ft away … when he received shot.”

Mr Frost, a white man, began filming after 20-year-old Justin Howell, an African American, was shot within the head with a “less-lethal” bean bag munition in Austin, Texas. Within the video, protesters had been seen carrying the injured man in direction of police, in an try to get assist. Then police opened fireplace once more.

Picture copyright
David Frost/Twitter

Picture caption

David Frost’s video confirmed protesters carrying Justin Howell in direction of police.

Mr Howell suffered life-changing accidents in consequence, together with mind injury and a fractured cranium. Mr Frost’s video was considered over 10 million occasions on Twitter, and was extensively coated by US media.

“It wasn’t till we had gotten nearly three million hits that the Austin Police Division even talked about something,” he says.

After the incident went viral, Austin police introduced they might now not be utilizing bean bag munition for crowd management.

Justin’s brother, Josh Howell, advised BBC Trending: “The quickness with which the video unfold on social media actually added to the entire response.”

Hear extra about this story

Listen to Trending on the BBC World Service

Police filming

There isn’t any single database counting the variety of folks killed by police in America annually, however knowledge collected by the unbiased analysis group Mapping Police Violence has discovered that on common practically 1,100 folks have been killed by police since 2013.

Whereas most are white, the useless are disproportionately African American: final 12 months they made up 24% of the entire regardless of being 13% of the American inhabitants.

Legal professionals and activists say they’re seeing extra video proof in circumstances involving police brutality.

There’s a “large improve,” within the variety of shoppers who’re coming in with filmed proof, says Tracey Brown, who heads the civil rights and police brutality group on the Cochran Agency in New York Metropolis.

That marks a change, she says, from the primary wave of Black Lives Matter protests. Then, many activists pushed the concept of police physique cams and dashcams mounted in police automobiles. However research present they have not led to a lower in police shootings or a rise in accountability.

“In lots of municipalities the law enforcement officials do not get charged,” Ms Brown says. She notes that in lots of locations, it is inconceivable to acquire disciplinary data which include, she says, “vital info when attempting to carry fees towards law enforcement officials”.

And simply because movies exist, it does not imply attorneys or the general public are all the time capable of see them.

“Police departments do not launch movies till you are properly right into a legal prosecution or a civil lawsuit,” she says.

In a single notable case, dashcam footage exhibiting that Laquan McDonald was strolling away from Chicago officers when he received shot was kept under wraps for over a 12 months, till strain by activists and journalists succeeded in getting it into the general public area. Officer Jason Van Dyke was ultimately convicted of second-degree murder.

Ethan Zuckerman, director of the Middle for Civic Media on the MIT Media Lab, says neither police cameras nor bystander footage can actually be an efficient verify on abuse.

“Our authorized system offers a lot flexibility to the police to make use of violence in the midst of finishing up their duties,” he says.

“Imagery could matter so far as getting folks out into the streets, however it doesn’t matter so far as stopping police from utilizing violence within the first place.”

Picture copyright
Getty Photos

Picture caption

Activists at a Black Lives Matter rally in New York

What subsequent?

Darnella Frazier’s footage of George Floyd’s dying wasn’t the primary viral video documenting a police killing – nor was it the final. Whereas such movies could have restricted impression in truly stemming violence, African Individuals and others will proceed to doc abuses for causes past easy prevention.

“Black folks choose up their cell telephones to do two issues,” says Alissa Richardson, “to say to the one that is dying, ‘I can’t allow you to die alone’, and ‘I’ll carry the message ahead to your loved ones – as a result of I do know that no person would imagine what occurred to you right here right now.”https://www.bbc.com/”

Is there a narrative we needs to be investigating?

Comply with us on Twitter @BBCtrending or on Facebook.





Source link

Tagged : / / / / / / /

Black Lives Matter: Can viral movies cease police brutality?


Photo montage of pictures of George Floyd

George Floyd’s dying won’t have induced world outrage if it hadn’t been filmed. However do viral movies really scale back police abuse?

“They killed this man, bro. He was crying, telling them ‘I can not breathe.”https://www.bbc.com/”

For greater than 5 minutes Darnella Frazier rambled on Fb Reside in regards to the killing she had witnessed – repeating again and again that she had video proof.

A short while afterward that night time in late Could, Frazier uploaded a video of the dying of George Floyd – together with the eight minutes and 46 seconds during which Derek Chauvin compelled his knee onto his neck.

Had it not been for that video and different footage from bystanders, it is possible that Mr Floyd’s dying would by no means have sparked world outrage. However does that make viral movies, shot on the cellphone in your hand, an efficient test on police abuse?

Picture copyright
Getty Pictures

Why was this one completely different?

Darnella Frazier’s video was removed from the primary viral footage to doc police brutality.

In 2016, Philando Castile died after being shot by police in his car. Just like the dying of George Floyd, Mr Castile’s dying additionally occurred in Minnesota – in Falcon Heights, only a quick drive from Minneapolis. His girlfriend live-streamed the speedy aftermath on Fb, together with pictures of Castile’s lifeless physique within the driver’s seat.

The day earlier than, Alton Sterling was killed by two cops outdoors a comfort retailer in Louisiana. Video proof filmed on a smartphone was posted on-line.

In 2014, footage captured occasions main as much as the deaths of Eric Garner in New York and Laquan McDonald in Chicago. In truth, many cite the beating of Rodney King by Los Angeles cops, captured on videotape in 1991, as one of many first “viral” police abuse movies – lengthy earlier than the social media period.

None of these occasions, nevertheless, sparked fairly the identical stage of world outrage because the footage of George Floyd.

Picture copyright
Getty Pictures

Picture caption

Protest indicators on the streets of Minneapolis

Consultants put the affect of Floyd’s dying all the way down to the size of the video, mixed with the precise nature of its graphic content material.

“Whereas a gunshot could be very fast, it’s instantly traumatic and really simple for one to look away,” says Allissa Richardson, creator of Bearing Witness Whereas Black: African People, Smartphones, and the New Protest #Journalism.

“This video transfixed folks due to the callous nature of the killing coupled with the brazen nature of the police, who knew they had been being filmed and nonetheless did it anyway,” she says.

On-line activism

The Black Lives Matter movement began in 2013, and the deaths of Mr Garner and of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, sparked large protests the next yr.

However Ms Richardson says relatively than ushering in a model new type of activism, new know-how is solely being deployed for a a lot older objective.

She makes use of the time period “black witnessing” to clarify how African People have traditionally tried to file injustices, relationship again to the period of slavery in pre-Civil Conflict America, drawing inspiration from Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave who led America’s abolitionist motion. In his first autobiography, Douglass documented his experiences as a slave.

“When black persons are selecting up their cell telephones, they don’t seem to be simply recording within the improper place on the proper time,” she says. “They’re trying to attach, traditionally, dots between atrocities.”

Others observe the defensive nature of the cell phone.

“For African People, each encounter with a legislation enforcement officer is doubtlessly a life and dying state of affairs,” says scientific psychologist Monnica Williams. “They movie these interactions for their very own safety.”

Watching the police

Within the wake of George Floyd’s killing, movies have additionally been utilized by activists to observe the policing of protests, typically in chaotic and complicated conditions.

When David Frost pressed file on his cellphone’s digicam throughout a protest on 31 Could, he thought the police had taken one other life.

“I needed as many individuals to see it [as possible],” he says. “I used to be six toes away … when he received shot.”

Mr Frost, a white man, began filming after 20-year-old Justin Howell, an African American, was shot within the head with a “less-lethal” bean bag munition in Austin, Texas. Within the video, protesters had been seen carrying the injured man in the direction of police, in an try and get assist. Then police opened fireplace once more.

Picture copyright
David Frost/Twitter

Picture caption

David Frost’s video confirmed protesters carrying Justin Howell in the direction of police.

Mr Howell suffered life-changing accidents in consequence, together with mind harm and a fractured cranium. Mr Frost’s video was considered over 10 million occasions on Twitter, and was extensively coated by US media.

“It wasn’t till we had gotten virtually three million hits that the Austin Police Division even talked about something,” he says.

After the incident went viral, Austin police introduced they might now not be utilizing bean bag munition for crowd management.

Justin’s brother, Josh Howell, advised BBC Trending: “The quickness with which the video unfold on social media actually added to the entire response.”

Hear extra about this story

Listen to Trending on the BBC World Service

Police filming

There isn’t any single database counting the variety of folks killed by police in America every year, however knowledge collected by the impartial analysis group Mapping Police Violence has discovered that on common almost 1,100 folks have been killed by police since 2013.

Whereas most are white, the useless are disproportionately African American: final yr they made up 24% of the entire regardless of being 13% of the American inhabitants.

Legal professionals and activists say they’re seeing extra video proof in instances involving police brutality.

There’s a “large improve,” within the variety of purchasers who’re coming in with filmed proof, says Tracey Brown, who heads the civil rights and police brutality group on the Cochran Agency in New York Metropolis.

That marks a change, she says, from the primary wave of Black Lives Matter protests. Then, many activists pushed the thought of police physique cams and dashcams mounted in police automobiles. However research present they have not led to a lower in police shootings or a rise in accountability.

“In lots of municipalities the cops do not get charged,” Ms Brown says. She notes that in lots of locations, it is unattainable to acquire disciplinary data which include, she says, “essential info when attempting to deliver costs in opposition to cops”.

And simply because movies exist, it does not imply legal professionals or the general public are at all times capable of see them.

“Police departments do not launch movies till you are effectively right into a prison prosecution or a civil lawsuit,” she says.

In a single notable case, dashcam footage exhibiting that Laquan McDonald was strolling away from Chicago officers when he received shot was kept under wraps for over a yr, till stress by activists and journalists succeeded in getting it into the general public area. Officer Jason Van Dyke was finally convicted of second-degree murder.

Ethan Zuckerman, director of the Middle for Civic Media on the MIT Media Lab, says neither police cameras nor bystander footage can actually be an efficient test on abuse.

“Our authorized system provides a lot flexibility to the police to make use of violence in the middle of finishing up their duties,” he says.

“Imagery might matter so far as getting folks out into the streets, but it surely doesn’t matter so far as stopping police from utilizing violence within the first place.”

Picture copyright
Getty Pictures

Picture caption

Activists at a Black Lives Matter rally in New York

What subsequent?

Darnella Frazier’s footage of George Floyd’s dying wasn’t the primary viral video documenting a police killing – nor was it the final. Whereas such movies might have restricted affect in really stemming violence, African People and others will proceed to doc abuses for causes past easy prevention.

“Black folks decide up their cell telephones to do two issues,” says Alissa Richardson, “to say to the one that is dying, ‘I can’t allow you to die alone’, and ‘I’ll carry the message ahead to your loved ones – as a result of I do know that no one would consider what occurred to you right here in the present day.”https://www.bbc.com/”

Is there a narrative we ought to be investigating?

Comply with us on Twitter @BBCtrending or on Facebook.





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Police Search 2 White Folks Who Have been Seen Vandalizing Black Lives Matter Mural


The police in Martinez, Calif., stated on Sunday that they have been searching for two white individuals who have been seen vandalizing a Black Lives Matter mural lower than an hour after it was painted in entrance of a neighborhood courthouse on Saturday.

“The group spent a substantial period of time placing the mural collectively solely to have it painted over in a hateful and mindless method,” Chief Manjit Sappal of the Martinez Police Division said in a statement. “The town of Martinez values tolerance, and the injury to the mural was divisive and hurtful.”

Movies posted on social media present a white lady utilizing a curler with black paint to cowl the letters B and L in “Black Lives Matter,” whereas a white man information onlookers yelling for them to cease.

The mural, in yellow paint in the course of a metropolis avenue, spelled out “Black Lives Matter” in capital letters.

The person, who may be seen in a video carrying a pink cap and a pink shirt that reads “Trump” and “4 Extra Years,” may be heard saying: “We’re sick of this narrative” and “The narrative of police brutality, the narrative of oppression, the narrative of racism. It’s a lie. It’s a lie.”

The person was additionally recorded going to a automotive parked close by to retrieve a can of black paint.

The girl, utilizing two expletives, tells onlookers to “hold this” in New York, including, “This isn’t occurring in my city.”

At one level, the person within the pink shirt tells onlookers: “Preserve America nice once more, that’s proper. Why don’t you guys find out about historical past, the Emancipation Proclamation Act?” and “You’re solely free due to our forefathers.”

A lady may be heard off-camera telling the person he’s not “from America” and that he’s a “colonizer.”

“You’re ancestors aren’t from right here,” she says.

“You don’t know nothing,” the person within the pink shirt replies.

That lady finally takes the can of black paint from them.

The connection between the 2 individuals who have been seen defacing the mural was unknown, and it was unclear what prices they may face. Police officers weren’t instantly accessible to touch upon Sunday night time.

Justin Gomez, a neighborhood resident who received permission from town to color the mural, stated of the vandalism on Sunday: “I’m not so stunned that it occurred. I’m stunned at how daring they selected to be.”

The mural was painted on a one-block stretch of Courtroom Road in Martinez, which is about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco. The town chosen the situation after Mr. Gomez, the lead organizer for Martizians for Black Lives, requested town for permission to color the message, he stated.

“We requested to do it on our metropolis’s most important avenue,” Mr. Gomez stated. The town, he stated, supplied the road in entrance of the Wakefield Taylor Courthouse as a substitute.

“We instantly agreed to it,” he stated, “and I really feel it was a extra highly effective assertion than what we had initially proposed.”

Mr. Gomez and native residents began portray the mural at 7 a.m. on Saturday; by 2:30 p.m., with the paint nonetheless drying, he left.

By three p.m., Mr. Gomez stated, he acquired messages saying the mural was being vandalized.

Mr. Gomez stated that the mural had since been restored and that supporters have been “sustaining a presence” to stop additional injury.

Related murals have been painted in cities throughout the nation, together with Washington, New York, Dallas and Los Angeles.



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Black Lives Matter: Can viral movies cease police brutality?


Photo montage of pictures of George Floyd

George Floyd’s loss of life won’t have triggered world outrage if it hadn’t been filmed. However do viral movies really cut back police abuse?

“They killed this man, bro. He was crying, telling them ‘I can not breathe.”https://www.bbc.com/”

For greater than 5 minutes Darnella Frazier rambled on Fb Stay in regards to the killing she had witnessed – repeating again and again that she had video proof.

A short while in a while that night time in late Could, Frazier uploaded a video of the loss of life of George Floyd – together with the eight minutes and 46 seconds during which Derek Chauvin pressured his knee onto his neck.

Had it not been for that video and different footage from bystanders, it is seemingly that Mr Floyd’s loss of life would by no means have sparked world outrage. However does that make viral movies, shot on the cellphone in your hand, an efficient examine on police abuse?

Picture copyright
Getty Pictures

Why was this one completely different?

Darnella Frazier’s video was removed from the primary viral footage to doc police brutality.

In 2016, Philando Castile died after being shot by police in his car. Just like the loss of life of George Floyd, Mr Castile’s loss of life additionally occurred in Minnesota – in Falcon Heights, only a brief drive from Minneapolis. His girlfriend live-streamed the instant aftermath on Fb, together with pictures of Castile’s lifeless physique within the driver’s seat.

The day earlier than, Alton Sterling was killed by two cops exterior a comfort retailer in Louisiana. Video proof filmed on a smartphone was posted on-line.

In 2014, footage captured occasions main as much as the deaths of Eric Garner in New York and Laquan McDonald in Chicago. In actual fact, many cite the beating of Rodney King by Los Angeles cops, captured on videotape in 1991, as one of many first “viral” police abuse movies – lengthy earlier than the social media period.

None of these occasions, nevertheless, sparked fairly the identical stage of worldwide outrage because the footage of George Floyd.

Picture copyright
Getty Pictures

Picture caption

Protest indicators on the streets of Minneapolis

Specialists put the impression of Floyd’s loss of life right down to the size of the video, mixed with the particular nature of its graphic content material.

“Whereas a gunshot may be very fast, it’s instantly traumatic and really straightforward for one to look away,” says Allissa Richardson, creator of Bearing Witness Whereas Black: African People, Smartphones, and the New Protest #Journalism.

“This video transfixed folks due to the callous nature of the killing coupled with the brazen nature of the police, who knew they have been being filmed and nonetheless did it anyway,” she says.

On-line activism

The Black Lives Matter movement began in 2013, and the deaths of Mr Garner and of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, sparked large protests the next yr.

However Ms Richardson says reasonably than ushering in a model new type of activism, new expertise is just being deployed for a a lot older function.

She makes use of the time period “black witnessing” to elucidate how African People have traditionally tried to file injustices, courting again to the period of slavery in pre-Civil Struggle America, drawing inspiration from Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave who led America’s abolitionist motion. In his first autobiography, Douglass documented his experiences as a slave.

“When black persons are choosing up their cell telephones, they don’t seem to be simply recording within the fallacious place on the proper time,” she says. “They’re making an attempt to attach, traditionally, dots between atrocities.”

Others observe the defensive nature of the cell phone.

“For African People, each encounter with a regulation enforcement officer is probably a life and loss of life state of affairs,” says scientific psychologist Monnica Williams. “They movie these interactions for their very own safety.”

Watching the police

Within the wake of George Floyd’s killing, movies have additionally been utilized by activists to observe the policing of protests, usually in chaotic and complicated conditions.

When David Frost pressed file on his cellphone’s digicam throughout a protest on 31 Could, he thought the police had taken one other life.

“I needed as many individuals to see it [as possible],” he says. “I used to be six ft away … when he acquired shot.”

Mr Frost, a white man, began filming after 20-year-old Justin Howell, an African American, was shot within the head with a “less-lethal” bean bag munition in Austin, Texas. Within the video, protesters have been seen carrying the injured man in the direction of police, in an try and get assist. Then police opened hearth once more.

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David Frost/Twitter

Picture caption

David Frost’s video confirmed protesters carrying Justin Howell in the direction of police.

Mr Howell suffered life-changing accidents because of this, together with mind harm and a fractured cranium. Mr Frost’s video was considered over 10 million occasions on Twitter, and was extensively coated by US media.

“It wasn’t till we had gotten nearly three million hits that the Austin Police Division even talked about something,” he says.

After the incident went viral, Austin police introduced they might not be utilizing bean bag munition for crowd management.

Justin’s brother, Josh Howell, instructed BBC Trending: “The quickness with which the video unfold on social media actually added to the entire response.”

Hear extra about this story

Listen to Trending on the BBC World Service

Police filming

There isn’t any single database counting the variety of folks killed by police in America annually, however knowledge collected by the impartial analysis group Mapping Police Violence has discovered that on common practically 1,100 folks have been killed by police since 2013.

Whereas most are white, the lifeless are disproportionately African American: final yr they made up 24% of the whole regardless of being 13% of the American inhabitants.

Attorneys and activists say they’re seeing extra video proof in instances involving police brutality.

There’s a “large enhance,” within the variety of shoppers who’re coming in with filmed proof, says Tracey Brown, who heads the civil rights and police brutality group on the Cochran Agency in New York Metropolis.

That marks a change, she says, from the primary wave of Black Lives Matter protests. Then, many activists pushed the thought of police physique cams and dashcams mounted in police automobiles. However research present they have not led to a lower in police shootings or a rise in accountability.

“In lots of municipalities the cops do not get charged,” Ms Brown says. She notes that in lots of locations, it is not possible to acquire disciplinary information which comprise, she says, “essential info when making an attempt to carry prices towards cops”.

And simply because movies exist, it doesn’t suggest attorneys or the general public are all the time in a position to see them.

“Police departments do not launch movies till you are effectively right into a prison prosecution or a civil lawsuit,” she says.

In a single notable case, dashcam footage displaying that Laquan McDonald was strolling away from Chicago officers when he acquired shot was kept under wraps for over a yr, till strain by activists and journalists succeeded in getting it into the general public area. Officer Jason Van Dyke was finally convicted of second-degree murder.

Ethan Zuckerman, director of the Middle for Civic Media on the MIT Media Lab, says neither police cameras nor bystander footage can actually be an efficient examine on abuse.

“Our authorized system provides a lot flexibility to the police to make use of violence in the middle of finishing up their duties,” he says.

“Imagery could matter so far as getting folks out into the streets, but it surely doesn’t matter so far as stopping police from utilizing violence within the first place.”

Picture copyright
Getty Pictures

Picture caption

Activists at a Black Lives Matter rally in New York

What subsequent?

Darnella Frazier’s footage of George Floyd’s loss of life wasn’t the primary viral video documenting a police killing – nor was it the final. Whereas such movies could have restricted impression in really stemming violence, African People and others will proceed to doc abuses for causes past easy prevention.

“Black folks choose up their cell telephones to do two issues,” says Alissa Richardson, “to say to the one that is dying, ‘I cannot allow you to die alone’, and ‘I’ll carry the message ahead to your loved ones – as a result of I do know that no one would imagine what occurred to you right here at present.”https://www.bbc.com/”

Is there a narrative we must be investigating?

Observe us on Twitter @BBCtrending or on Facebook.





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Fox Information’ Tucker Carlson Says Black Lives Matter ‘Is Poison’



“You understand, I do know loads of people who find themselves for Black Lives Matter. A number of them are good folks,” Carlson mentioned on the newest episode of conservative web site The Federalist’s “Federalist Radio Hour” present.

“I’m not mad at them. I disagree,” he continued. “I feel Black Lives Matter is poison. OK, they’ve one other view. That’s alright.” 

Carlson has ramped up his on-air assaults on BLM in latest weeks.

On Wednesday, he used his primetime “Tucker Carlson Tonight” present to lash out at what he outlined because the “hysteria” surrounding the motion.





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A Jersey Mike’s tribute to Black Lives Matter went viral. However it’s pretend.


Common New Jersey-based sub store Jersey Mike’s discovered itself going viral on Twitter this week. And it didn’t even write the tweet that was trending.

Comic Yassir Lester tweeted what seemed to be an announcement from Jersey Mike’s on June 30 that claimed the corporate could be altering the identify of its bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich to a bacon, lettuce and ‘mato sandwich — a BLM, an obvious tribute to Black Lives Matter.

With an increasing number of corporations and companies making statements in assist of the Black Lives Matter motion, it didn’t appear fully out of the realm of risk, although a comic is hardly the supply you’d anticipate this message to return from.

A fast have a look at Jersey Mike’s social media accounts would present the corporate by no means posted such a message.

However that didn’t cease the tweet from going viral, with many voicing concern.

About 12 hours after his preliminary tweet, Lester clarified with one other tweet explaining that the assertion was satire — a joke about how company America is trying to seem supportive of Black Lives Matter.

“How dangerous off are we that we thought a company would rename a sandwich, offensively, as an announcement of solidarity?” Lester mentioned. “It’s to not say I don’t perceive the fast outrage, which is why I led with the primary query. Jersey Mike’s didn’t say this, no. However numerous companies have come shut. They’ve all promised cash to ‘the neighborhood’ but we don’t know the place any of it’s going.”

Jersey Mike’s began in Level Nice again in 1956 however now has greater than 1,700 areas around the globe, together with worldwide areas in Australia and Canada. Its headquarters is now in Wall Township in Monmouth County.

Lester is a humorist, author and actor who has written for exhibits like “The Carmichael Present” and “Women” and acted in “Making Historical past” and “Black Monday.”

Our journalism wants your assist. Please subscribe today to NJ.com.

Jeremy Schneider could also be reached at jschneider@njadvancemedia.com. Inform us your coronavirus story or ship a tip here.



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Trump calls Black Lives Matter mural ‘an emblem of hate’


WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump criticized a proposed Black Lives Matter mural to be painted exterior Trump Tower as a “image of hate” Wednesday whereas denouncing New York Metropolis Mayor Invoice de Blasio, who ordered the phrase painted exterior Trump’s longtime workplace.

De Blasio mentioned he ordered the mural – the phrases “Black Lives Matter” painted in vivid letters – to be positioned proper in entrance of Trump Tower for a purpose. 

“We’re going to take this second in historical past and amplify it by taking the ‘Black Lives Matter’ symbolism and placing it throughout this metropolis, together with proper in entrance of Trump Tower,” the mayor advised MSNBC on Wednesday.

Trump responded by attacking the mayor for the mural and his plan to chop as much as $1 billion from the New York City police budget.

“NYC is slicing Police $’s by ONE BILLION DOLLARS, and but the @NYCMayor goes to color an enormous, costly, yellow Black Lives Matter signal on Fifth Avenue, denigrating this luxurious Avenue,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “Perhaps our GREAT Police, who’ve been neutralized and scorned by a mayor who hates & disrespects them, gained’t let this image of hate be affixed to New York’s biggest road.  Spend this cash combating crime as a substitute!”

The president didn’t point out that the Black Lives Matter mural is slated to be proper exterior Trump Tower. Trump dominated his actual property and media empire from the glass skyscraper that opened in 1983. Trump Tower additionally served as the house base for his tv present, “The Apprentice,” in addition to his 2016 presidential marketing campaign. 

De Blasio mentioned portray Black Lives Matter on Fifth Avenue is designed partly to ship a message to Trump.

“It is an vital message to the entire nation, and clearly we wish the president to listen to it as a result of he is by no means proven respect for these three phrases,” de Blasio mentioned on MSNBC. “When he hears ‘Black Lives Matter,’ he presents a horrible, detrimental actuality of one thing that does not exist and he misses the underlying that means that we’re saying we have now to honor the position of African Individuals in our historical past and in our society.”

Extra: USA TODAY Poll: Forceful clearing of Lafayette Square protest was defining moment for president and protests

Extra: Walmart will stop selling ‘All Lives Matter’ merchandise

Trump and aides have described some supporters of Black Lives Matter as vandals. They cite property harm and a few violence throughout nationwide protests of police brutality, significantly after the Could 25 loss of life of George Floyd by the hands of officers in Minneapolis.

White Home press secretary Kayleigh McEnany mentioned Trump does consider that “black lives matter,” however he condemns the anti-police chants made by some members of the Black Lives Matter group   

Supporters of Black Lives Matter mentioned Trump is making an attempt to lump a whole group of individuals with the few who grew violent at a number of the protests. They mentioned Trump is just making an attempt to enchantment to white racists who’re a part of his political base.

“The person who spent your entire morning tweeting about preserving the legacy of the confederacy and its inextricable hyperlink to slavery thinks declaring that Black individuals have the suitable to reside and be handled pretty is hateful,” tweeted Bishop Talbert Swan, a pastor and radio host. “That is America.”

Rick Tyler, an anti-Trump Republican strategist, known as the Black Lives Matter tweet “unhinged” – and doubtless not the final time we hear from Trump on the topic.

“Let’s see how he reacts once they paint it in entrance of Trump Tower,” Tyler mentioned.

The phrase “Black Lives Matter,” written in massive 50-foot yellow letters, was painted on Washington, D.C., road simply north of the White Home in early June. Comparable tributes can now be seen on streets across the U.S. 

Learn or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/information/politics/2020/07/01/trump-tower-trump-calls-black-lives-matter-mural-a-symbol-hate/5356189002/





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Trump calls Black Lives Matter mural ‘a logo of hate’


CLOSE

ASHINGTON – President Donald Trump criticized a proposed Black Lives Matter mural to be painted outdoors Trump Tower a “image of hate” Wednesday whereas denouncing New York Metropolis Mayor Invoice de Blasio, who ordered the phrase painted outdoors Trump’s longtime workplace.

De Blasio stated he ordered the mural – the phrases “Black Lives Matter” painted in brilliant letters – to be positioned proper in entrance of Trump Tower for a cause. 

“We’re going to take this second in historical past and amplify it by taking the ‘Black Lives Matter’ symbolism by placing it throughout this metropolis, together with in entrance of Trump Tower,” the mayor advised MSNBC on Wednesday.

Trump responded by attacking the mayor for the mural and his plan to chop as much as $1 billion from the New York City police budget.

“NYC is reducing Police $’s by ONE BILLION DOLLARS, and but the @NYCMayor goes to color an enormous, costly, yellow Black Lives Matter signal on Fifth Avenue, denigrating this luxurious Avenue,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “Possibly our GREAT Police, who’ve been neutralized and scorned by a mayor who hates & disrespects them, gained’t let this image of hate be affixed to New York’s biggest road.  Spend this cash preventing crime as a substitute!”

The president didn’t point out that the Black Lives Matter mural is slated to be proper outdoors Trump Tower. Trump dominated his actual property and media empire from the glass skyscraper that opened in 1983. Trump Tower additionally served as the house base for his tv present, “The Apprentice,” in addition to his 2016 presidential marketing campaign. 

De Blasio stated portray Black Lives Matter on Fifth Avenue is designed partly to ship a message to Trump.

“It is an essential message to the entire nation, and clearly we wish the president to listen to it as a result of he is by no means proven respect for these three phrases,” de Blasio stated on MSNBC. “When he hears ‘Black Lives Matter,’ he presents a horrible, destructive actuality of one thing that does not exist and he misses the underlying which means that we’re saying we’ve got to honor the position of African People in our historical past and in our society.”

Extra: USA TODAY Poll: Forceful clearing of Lafayette Square protest was defining moment for president and protests

Extra: Walmart will stop selling ‘All Lives Matter’ merchandise

Trump and aides have described some supporters of Black Lives Matter as vandals. They cite property injury and a few violence throughout nationwide protests of police brutality, significantly after the Might 25 demise of George Floyd by the hands of officers in Minneapolis.

Supporters of Black Lives Matter stated Trump is attempting to lump a whole group of individuals with the few who grew violent at a number of the protests. They stated Trump is solely attempting to enchantment to white racists who’re a part of his political base.

“The person who spent your complete morning tweeting about preserving the legacy of the confederacy and its inextricable hyperlink to slavery thinks declaring that Black folks have the suitable to dwell and be handled pretty is hateful,” tweeted Bishop Talbert Swan, a pastor and radio host. “That is America.”

Rick Tyler, an anti-Trump Republican strategist, referred to as the Black Lives Matter tweet “unhinged” – and doubtless not the final time we hear from Trump on the topic.

“Let’s see how he reacts after they paint it in entrance of Trump Tower,” Tyler stated.

The phrase “Black Lives Matter,” written in massive 50-foot yellow letters, was painted on Washington, D.C., road simply north of the White Home in early June. Related tributes can now be seen on streets across the U.S. 

Learn or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/information/politics/2020/07/01/trump-tower-trump-calls-black-lives-matter-mural-a-symbol-hate/5356189002/





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