Some COVID-19 Victims Creating Harmful And Perplexing Blood Clots



First got here a excessive fever, drenching sweats and muscle aches. Then, virtually a month later, a bizarre numbness that unfold down the fitting facet of her physique.

Darlene Gildersleeve thought she had recovered from COVID-19. Medical doctors stated she simply wanted relaxation. And for a number of days, nobody suspected her worsening signs had been associated — till a Could four video name, when her doctor heard her slurred speech and consulted a specialist.

“You’ve had two strokes,’’ a neurologist informed her on the hospital. The Hopkinton, New Hampshire, mom of three is barely 43.

Blood clots that may trigger strokes, coronary heart assaults and harmful blockages within the legs and lungs are more and more being present in COVID-19 sufferers, together with some kids. Even tiny clots that may harm tissue all through the physique have been seen in hospitalized sufferers and in autopsies, confounding docs’ understanding of what was as soon as thought-about primarily a respiratory an infection.

“I’ve to be humble and say I don’t know what’s happening there, however boy we have to discover that out as a result of except you understand what the pathogenic (disease-causing) mechanism is, it’s going to be powerful to do intervention,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s high infectious illness knowledgeable, remarked throughout a medical journal interview final month.

Medical doctors and scientists at dozens of hospitals and universities across the globe are looking for solutions whereas making an attempt to measure virus sufferers’ dangers for clots and testing medicine to deal with or stop them.

Gildersleeve stated well being authorities “have to put out an pressing warning about strokes” and coronavirus. Not figuring out the attainable hyperlink “made me doubt myself” when signs appeared, she stated.

Some situations that make some COVID-19 sufferers susceptible to extreme issues, together with weight problems and diabetes, can improve clot dangers. However many authorities consider how the virus assaults and the best way the physique responds each play a task.

“COVID-19 is essentially the most thrombotic (clot-producing) illness we’ve ever seen in our lifetime,” stated Dr. Alex Spyropoulos, a clot specialist and professor at Feinstein Institutes for Medical Analysis in Manhasset, New York.

Clotting has been seen in different coronavirus infections, together with SARS, however on a a lot smaller scale, he stated.

Scientists consider the coronavirus enters the physique by means of enzyme-receptors discovered all through the physique, together with in cells lining the within of blood vessels. Some theorize that it might promote clotting by someway injuring these vessels because it spreads. That damage might trigger a extreme immune response because the physique tries to combat the an infection, leading to irritation that will additionally harm vessels and promote clotting, stated Dr. Valentin Fuster, director of Mount Sinai Coronary heart hospital in New York.

It’s unclear what number of COVID-19 sufferers develop clots. Research from China, Europe and america counsel charges starting from 3% to 70% of hospitalized COVID-19 sufferers; extra rigorous analysis is required to find out the true prevalence, the Nationwide Institutes of Well being says.

Prevalence in sufferers with gentle illness is unknown and the company says there isn’t sufficient proof to advocate routine clot screening for all virus sufferers with out clotting signs, which can embrace swelling, ache or reddish discoloring in an arm or leg.

Some hospitals have discovered 40% of deaths in COVID-19 sufferers are from blood clots. Spyropoulos stated that’s been true at his 23-hospital system within the New York Metropolis space, Northwell Well being, which has handled over 11,000 COVID-19 sufferers.

Instances there have dropped by virtually half prior to now month, permitting extra time for analysis earlier than an anticipated second and perhaps third wave of infections, he stated, including: “We’re racing towards time to reply the important thing scientific questions.”

Sufferers hospitalized with any extreme sickness face elevated dangers for clots, partly from being bedridden and inactive. They generally obtain blood-thinning medicine for prevention. Some docs are attempting higher-than-usual doses for prevention in hospitalized coronavirus sufferers.

A number of have used highly effective clot-busting medicines usually used to deal with strokes, with blended outcomes. In steerage issued Could 12, the NIH stated extra analysis is required to point out whether or not that strategy has any advantages.

Fuster was concerned in preliminary analysis on almost 2,800 COVID-19 sufferers at 5 hospitals within the Mount Sinai system. A have a look at their outcomes suggests barely higher survival possibilities for virus sufferers on ventilators who obtained blood thinners than amongst those that didn’t. Though the outcomes will not be conclusive, all COVID-19 sufferers at Mount Sinai obtain blood thinners for clot prevention except they’re in danger for bleeding, a possible facet impact, Fuster stated.

Some COVID-19 sufferers, like Gildersleeve, develop harmful clots when their infections appear to have subsided, Spyropoulos stated. Sufferers handled at Northwell for extreme illness are despatched house with a once-a-day blood thinner and a quickly to be printed research will element their experiences. Spyropoulos has been a paid advisor to Janssen Prescribed drugs, makers of Xarelto, the drug’s model title.

As well as, Northwell is participating in a multi-center research that can take a look at utilizing blood thinners for clot prevention in COVID-19 sufferers not sick sufficient to require hospitalization.

In a small research printed Could 15, College of Colorado docs discovered that mixed scores on two exams measuring clotting markers within the blood may help decide which sufferers will develop massive harmful clots. One take a look at measures a protein fragment known as D-dimer, a remnant of dissolved clots. Excessive ranges typically point out harmful clots that type deep in leg veins and journey to the lungs or different organs.

Dr. Behnood Bikdeli of Columbia College’s Irving Medical Heart, stated D-dimer ranges in lots of his COVID-19 sufferers have been alarmingly excessive, as a lot as 50 instances increased than regular.

Considerations about blood clots in COVID-19 sufferers prompted a latest 30-page consensus assertion from a world group of physicians and researchers. Bikdeli is the lead creator.

It says that testing to seek out clots that require remedy contains X-rays or ultrasound exams, however poses a danger for well being care staff as a result of the virus is so contagious. Bikdeli stated he fears when protecting gear was extra scarce, some harmful clots had been undiagnosed and untreated.

Social distancing might make individuals extra sedentary and extra susceptible to clots, significantly older adults, so docs ought to encourage exercise or workout routines that may be finished within the house as a safety measure, the assertion says.

Warnell Vega bought that recommendation after collapsing at house April 19 from a big clot blocking a lung artery. Medical doctors at Mount Sinai Morningside suppose it was coronavirus-related. Vega, 33, a lunch maker for New York Metropolis faculty kids, spent per week in intensive care on oxygen and blood thinners, which he’s been informed to proceed taking for 3 months.

“I simply must be careful for any bleeding, and must watch out to not lower myself,” Vega stated.

Gildersleeve, the New Hampshire stroke affected person, was additionally despatched house with a blood thinner. She will get bodily remedy to enhance power and stability. She nonetheless has some numbness and imaginative and prescient issues that imply driving is out, for now.

Medical doctors are unable to foretell when or whether or not she’ll regain all her skills.

’’I’m making an attempt to stay constructive about recovering,” she stated. ’’I simply must be affected person and take heed to my physique and never push too exhausting.”

Comply with AP Medical Author Lindsey Tanner at @LindseyTanner.

The Related Press Well being and Science Division receives assist from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Division of Science Training. The AP is solely chargeable for all content material.





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WHO drops hydroxychloroquine from COVID-19 research


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Regardless of President Trump’s ideas, drug and illness consultants appear to agree that hydroxychloroquine is just not a confirmed preventative measure for COVID-19.

USA TODAY

The World Well being Group introduced Monday a “momentary pause” on the inclusion of an anti-malarial drug, which President Donald Trump stated he used to assist stave off coronavirus, in a worldwide research on potential remedies for the illness. 

WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus stated in a information convention that the chief group overseeing the group’s “Solidarity” trial of experimental remedies determined Saturday to droop the use hydroxychloroquine in gentle a research published in The Lancet that discovered a decrease survival price amongst hospitalized COVID-19 sufferers utilizing the drug. 

The trial’s steering committee will use the pause to permit the Information Security Monitoring Board to conduct a evaluate and appraisal of “all proof obtainable globally” to “adequately consider the potential advantages and harms from this drug,” Tedros stated. 

Hydroxychloroquine was certainly one of 4 medicine and drug mixtures included within the Solidarity trial, which has enrolled greater than 3,500 sufferers in 17 international locations, in accordance with Tedros. Different potential remedies, together with the experimental drug remdesivir and an HIV mixture remedy, are nonetheless being examined.

“We wish to use hydroxychloroquine whether it is protected and efficacious, if it reduces mortality, reduces the size of hospitalization, with out growing the hostile occasions,” stated Dr. Soumya Swaminathan, WHO’s chief scientist. Swaminathan stated she anticipated the Solidarity trial’s steering committee to evaluate the Information Security Monitoring Board’s findings throughout the subsequent two weeks. 

Can hydroxychloroquine forestall COVID-19?: President Donald Trump thinks maybe. There’s no data to support that.

Dr. Michael Ryan, WHO’s emergencies chief, stated the pause was “customary follow” and that if the evaluate doesn’t discover any issues, the usage of the drug within the solidarity trial would resume. 

“This has purely been carried out as a precaution so as to have the ability to have that information reviewed and have the correct course of,” Ryan stated.

Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are accredited for treating lupus and rheumatoid arthritis and for stopping and treating malaria, however no massive rigorous exams have discovered them protected or efficient for stopping or treating COVID-19.

‘It will kill you’: People are warning others following Trump’s apparent use of hydroxychloroquine

‘I feel she’s a waste of time’: Trump dismisses Nancy Pelosi calling him ‘morbidly obese,’ hydroxychloroquine concern

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cautioned in April that the drug has “not been proven to be protected and efficient for treating or stopping COVID-19” and that it shouldn’t be used “exterior of the hospital setting or a medical trial resulting from threat of coronary heart rhythm issues.” 

Regardless of the shortage of proof that it labored and the FDA’s warning, Trump has repeatedly endorsed the usage of the drug, saying he had a “feeling” it was efficient and telling People, “What do you need to lose? Take it.”

The president advised reporters on Could 18 that he had been taking the drug as a prophylactic to stop an infection. In an interview that aired Sunday, he stated he “just finished” his hydroxychloroquine routine. 

“And by the best way, I am nonetheless right here. To the very best of my information, right here I’m,” Trump stated on  Sinclair Broadcast’s program “Full Measure With Sharyl Attkisson.” 

Trump has fiercely criticized the WHO’s dealing with of the coronavirus pandemic, accusing of performing too slowly and too keen to simply accept China’s preliminary denial that there was no proof of human-to-human transmission. He has quickly frozen U.S. funding of the group and threatened to make it permanent by pulling out of the United Well being company solely. 

WHO has disputed Trump’s allegation that it ought to have sounded the alarm on the outbreak sooner. Tedros has vowed to have an unbiased evaluate of the group’s response “on the earliest acceptable second.”

Contributing: Kim Hjelmgaard and Courtney Subramanian, USA TODAY; The Related Press 

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Here is how an unapproved drug like remdesivir, utilized in COVID-19 remedies, is authorized, even when it is unapproved by the FDA with unknown outcomes.

USA TODAY

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1 in 5 lecturers could not return: Ballot


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For some highschool senior, the choice to attend school within the fall has shifted amidst the coronavirus pandemic.

USA TODAY

Most Individuals anticipate colleges to reopen within the fall, however a shocking variety of lecturers and college students will not be there.

In an unique USA TODAY/Ipsos poll, 1 in 5 lecturers say they’re unlikely to return to highschool if their lecture rooms reopen within the fall, a possible large wave of resignations. Whereas most lecturers report working greater than traditional, almost two-thirds say they have not been capable of correctly do their jobs in an academic system upended by the coronavirus. 

A separate ballot of fogeys with a minimum of one youngster in grades Okay-12 finds that 6in 10 say they’d be more likely to pursue at-home studying choices as an alternative of sending again their kids this fall. Practically a 3rd of fogeys, 30%, say they’re “very doubtless” to do this. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has recast training in america, prompting nearly each district to ship their college students residence and rapidly undertake distance studying to shut out the varsity 12 months that’s now ending. These disruptions are assured to reverberate into the brand new college 12 months and past, particularly for lecturers who’ve been thrust into new roles that the majority say they weren’t well-trained to fill. 

The surveys underscore how issues concerning the coronavirus will complicate efforts to renew every day routines in American life, from work to leisure to commerce, a minimum of till a vaccine is extensively obtainable.

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R-Zero could also be a very powerful scientific time period you’ve by no means heard of in terms of stopping the coronavirus pandemic.

USA TODAY

“I am on a committee with my district speaking concerning the what-ifs, as a result of we do not have solutions on what will occur,” mentioned J.W. White, 47, a center college instructor from Fort Value who was amongst these surveyed. “The expectation of fogeys and society is we’re sending our youngsters to be educated in a protected atmosphere, and the way we will present that protected atmosphere is totally unknown.”

What colleges will seem like once they reopen: Scheduled days home, more online learning, lots of hand-washing

The challenges up to now few months have generally been overwhelming, the language arts instructor mentioned in a follow-up interview. “I really feel very disconnected from my college students,” she mentioned, “and I really feel like they’re falling behind.”

To discover the views of lecturers and oldsters, USA TODAY and Ipsos performed parallel on-line polls Might 18-21. In a single, 505 lecturers of kindergarten by highschool have been surveyed. The opposite nationwide survey polled 403 dad and mom of a Okay-12 youngster.

The credibility intervals, akin to a margin of error, are plus or minus 5 share factors for the survey of lecturers and 5.6 factors for the survey of fogeys with school-aged kids. 

“As our world has modified, nearly every little thing we do has modified, together with how we view and strategy training,” Cliff Younger, president of Ipsos, mentioned. “Although Individuals are optimistic a couple of return to in-person studying, there may be angst amongst lecturers, dad and mom and America at massive about tips on how to hold our colleges protected if the virus isn’t absolutely contained.”

Amongst key findings: 

Lecturers are struggling

Nearly all of them, 83%, say they’re having a tougher time doing their job proper now, and two-thirds say they’ve needed to work greater than traditional. Two-thirds additionally say they have not been capable of do their job correctly since beginning to educate remotely, a activity that the majority say they hadn’t been ready properly by the district to do.

The most recent lecturers, those that have been on the job for 5 years or much less, struggled probably the most with distance educating; 6 in 10 mentioned they hadn’t been skilled properly for the duty. The oldest lecturers had probably the most issue coping with expertise. Amongst lecturers 55 and older, 1 in four mentioned it hasn’t been simple for them to make use of the expertise required. 

Dad and mom acknowledge how arduous lecturers are working. Seven in 10 say lecturers are “working tougher now than they ever have.”

Youngsters’s progress is in peril

Three-fourths of lecturers say having to depend on distance studying is making their college students fall behind of their classwork, though most additionally predict that they are going to finally have the ability to make up misplaced floor. By a sweeping margin, 6-1, lecturers say they’re frightened about their college students proper now; half of lecturers are “very” frightened.

Dad and mom are additionally frightened about their kids, in fact, however at decrease ranges, by lower than 2-1. Dad and mom are a lot much less doubtless than lecturers to say that their kids are actually falling behind; 46% of fogeys say that, in contrast with 76% of lecturers.

Each dad and mom and lecturers acknowledge how troublesome it has been for the opposite group to help distance studying. A 52% majority of fogeys say lecturers have struggled; 85% of lecturers say dad and mom have struggled.

Know-how is working for many

Nearly all dad and mom say their kids have entry to dependable web service at residence that permits them to check; simply 3% say they do not. What’s extra, 86% of fogeys say their kids have the software program and tools they want; 10% say they do not. Usually, dad and mom report that the expertise has been simple to make use of.

Nonetheless, lower-income households have been more likely to face hurdles in entry to expertise. Practically 1 in 5 of these in households with annual earnings of lower than $50,000 a 12 months mentioned their kids lacked essential software program and tools for on-line studying.

Coronavirus’ on-line college is tough sufficient. What if you’re still learning to speak English?

Getting a vaccine is seen as vital 

A major share of fogeys and lecturers, about 4 in 10, oppose returning to the classroom earlier than there’s a coronavirus vaccine. (Barely extra help returning to highschool with out a vaccine, however in every case lower than a majority.) 

That day is not shut. Probably the most optimistic predictions say a vaccine is perhaps developed by the top of the 12 months; the much less optimistic ones say it might take properly into subsequent 12 months and even longer. 

There is a seek for options  

Roughly two-thirds of lecturers and of fogeys help the concept of returning to the classroom for 2 or three days per week, and utilizing distance studying the opposite days. About two-thirds of each teams additionally endorse having lecturers thought-about at excessive threat for the sickness proceed to show on-line, whereas lecturers at low threat educate in particular person. 

Dad and mom and lecturers confirmed extra of a cut up on the concept of extending the varsity 12 months, beginning courses earlier in the summertime and persevering with into the following summer time. Dad and mom have been inclined to help the concept, 47%-36%. Lecturers opposed it, 57%-34%.

One other divide: 40% of fogeys say public-school teachers are paid fairly. Simply 24% of lecturers agree. 

‘These youngsters are coming again’: Reopened Montana school offers peek at what fall might bring

Social distancing in school? Good luck with that

Lecturers are prepared for modifications within the college routine subsequent fall. Practically eight in 10 lecturers say they’d be more likely to put on a masks whereas educating, and almost 6 in 10 say they’re more likely to work longer hours. However almost 9 in 10 warn that they foresee difficulties in implementing social distancing amongst their college students.

Dad and mom agree. Seven in 10 would ask their youngster to put on a masks in school, however greater than two-thirds say their youngster would discover it arduous to adjust to social distancing.

“Having to be 6 toes aside is troublesome for adults, and it is much more troublesome for youths,” mentioned Andrea Rodriquez, 23, a Pittsburgh elementary-school instructor who works with younger children who are learning English as a second language. That is been troublesome to do with out private interplay. 

“We attempt to do our greatest, but it surely’s not the identical when they’re at school so we are able to know that they are understanding.” she mentioned. The change was so abrupt, and lecturers are nonetheless attempting to determine tips on how to make it work. “One week we have been working and the opposite week every little thing modified. No person knew it could occur, what instruments to make use of. We’ve realized on the way in which.”

If colleges reopen this fall, almost 1 in 5 lecturers surveyed mentioned they weren’t more likely to return to educating. Amongst lecturers 55 and older, these with probably the most expertise, one in 4 mentioned they most likely would not return.

Andy Brown, 43, who teaches at a rural highschool in Mantua, Ohio, says after 20 years on the job he’s reconsidering whether or not to return. “For the primary time … these final three months have felt like I have been doing a job, doing this to earn a paycheck,” he mentioned. “The engagement stage with the scholars hasn’t been there, and that is the rationale I acquired into this profession – the interplay and the engagement and the seeing and feeling their pleasure.” 

His cross-curriculum class, tracing the environmental historical past of america, had been engaged on a two-year undertaking to construct an aquaponic greenhouse. The certificates of occupancy for the brand new constructing had been granted the day earlier than the varsity district shut down.

There are qualms amongst dad and mom as properly. If lecture rooms reopen this fall, dad and mom by 59%-36% say they’d be more likely to pursue at-home choices, similar to an internet courses or residence education. By double digits, males have been extra doubtless than ladies to contemplate pursuing these alternate options. These with decrease family incomes have been extra than these with larger incomes, and racial minorities have been extra than whites.

Prefer it or not, dad and mom and lecturers agreed on this: Colleges are more likely to reopen within the fall. Sixty-three p.c of fogeys and 65% of lecturers referred to as that very or considerably doubtless. 

Regardless of the challenges of the second, lecturers’ dedication to their jobs appears to have been strengthened, not shaken. In a USA TODAY/Ipsos ballot of lecturers in January 2019, 92% mentioned they cherished their jobs; now 90% do, not a statistically vital drop. Now almost half, 48%, say they’ve considered leaving their job as a instructor. However that is a decline from final 12 months, when a 54% majority had considered it.

What’s extra, 77% now say if they might choose a profession over again, they’d nonetheless resolve to be a instructor – a tick up from the 73% who expressed that view final 12 months, earlier than the pandemic started.

Sara Waugh, 37, who teaches laptop expertise at a highschool in Omaha, spent the final week of the varsity 12 months within the district’s necessary coaching on tips on how to educate on-line, to allow them to be higher ready for that chance within the fall. The variety of coronavirus instances is continuous to rise in the neighborhood, partially due to outbreaks at native meat-packing vegetation. “We do not know what is going on to go on within the fall,” she mentioned. “I can not even speculate. I’ve heard 100 totally different rumors.”

She’ll be there it doesn’t matter what, she mentioned. “I really like what I do and I really feel like what I do will be tailored to a distant studying atmosphere,” she mentioned, maybe extra simply than topics like English or science. “I really feel like it may be finished.”

Extra from USA TODAY

More strikes ahead? Teachers say they love their jobs but can’t pay their bills

Fact check: CDC’s guidelines for reopening schools are recommendations, not rules

Outnumbered school counselors struggle to keep kids safe remotely

Special education families struggle with coronavirus school closures

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A Chilly Conflict legacy many Individuals overlook



The echoes are being heard throughout: When the German newspaper Die Welt decried China’s newest strikes to squelch Hong Kong’s autonomy, it branded town the new “West Berlin.” And the renewed specter of nice energy competitors has even led notable coverage wonks to ponder a return to Chilly Conflict-era skulduggery.

“A couple of years from now, Washington would possibly discover itself desperately in search of covert choices to forestall some vital nation in sub-Saharan Africa, the Center East or Southeast Asia from aligning with Beijing,” wrote Hal Brands, a historian on the Johns Hopkins College College of Superior Worldwide Research whose professorial chair is known as after Henry Kissinger, the inveterate Chilly Warrior and U.S. diplomat.

How vital is remembering all this historical past at a time when there’s resurgent ‘Chilly Conflict’ speak vis-a-vis China?

For lots of causes, I feel a “new Chilly Conflict” with China could be very completely different, if it occurred in any respect. However I do know we will’t have a accountable dialog concerning the chance if we don’t know the complete fact of what occurred within the final one. And I feel we’ve got saved a part of it in the dead of night for self-interested causes, and the mature factor is to face them.

It has been actually maddening, distressing even, to see folks have a good time coups and overseas interventions after I spent the final three years actually attending to know their victims. With out denying the nice the U.S. has achieved, with this guide I’ve simply tried to point out their facet, too.

What’s the ‘Jakarta technique?’

The “Jakarta technique” is the intentional extermination of leftists or accused leftists. Within the Chilly Conflict this was achieved with a selected objective: to permit for right-wing authoritarian regimes to take energy, and maintain on to it. So the mass homicide of harmless civilians was not random violence that wild dictatorships employed irresponsibly or as revenge, however was integral to the creation of a constellation of U.S.-allied anti-communist regimes. It obtained this identify as a result of right-wing actions in Latin America checked out Indonesia 1965, the worst bloodbath of the sort and essentially the most horribly profitable, and got here up with names like “Operação Jacarta” or “Plan Yakarta” in Portuguese and Spanish.

The massacres you write about within the guide — notably what came about in Indonesia — appear to have been memory-holed within the U.S., but additionally to some extent in Indonesia, too. How was this act of forgetting potential?

In Indonesia the reply is evident — the dictatorship hid the reality of what occurred, and to at the present time it’s unlawful to defend “communism” in any means, so severe dialogue of 1965 may be very dangerous for Indonesians. The army that took energy that 12 months remains to be very influential, and even below President Jokowi they’ve screened the grotesque Suharto-era propaganda movie blaming the left for the violence. Within the U.S., I can solely guess. However I feel that the vastly consequential flip in 1965 — from a left-leaning anti-imperialist nation to a U.S.-aligned authoritarian nation open for enterprise — was shortly overshadowed by the Vietnam Conflict. The conflicts in Indochina truly affected home coverage and U.S. residents, whereas Indonesia was only a fast and painless victory for the West. However it was not painless in any respect for Indonesians, after all.

That form of American blind spot appears vital.

I feel it’s a gaping gap, and a extremely major problem. It stops us from understanding the character of the worldwide system created by the Chilly Conflict, and blocks us from understanding the best way that many different nations see us.

Is there a hazard that, in framing the ‘nature of the worldwide system’ this fashion, you maybe obscure the real worry that communist factions impressed in elements of the world?

I don’t assume it should, and I hope within the case of my guide it doesn’t. Some officers within the U.S. and elsewhere acted cynically, exaggerating the communist menace, however many others genuinely believed they have been doing the fitting factor or saving the world. Now, that can also be true for people appearing in each form of regime possible. What issues for us now could be the implications.

I actually don’t assume there’s quite a lot of proof that authoritarian socialism of a North Korean or Stalinist kind would have “gained the Chilly Conflict” if Jacobo Árbenz was allowed to implement land reform in Guatemala, or the unarmed Indonesian communists, who repeatedly did effectively in elections, weren’t rounded up and murdered, or if that they had let Allende run Chile with out facing right-wing terror. However even for those who take that extra excessive place, I feel recognizing the next is vital: The Soviet system is gone. However we nonetheless dwell in a world straight formed by pro-capitalist violence that’s typically unrecognized and unresolved.

Personally, I’ve no want to attenuate the actual and well-recognized crimes dedicated by communist leaders. What I hope is that our facet is held to the identical requirements.

How do you interpret the resurgent nostalgia in Brazil, at the least on the a part of President Jair Bolsonaro, for the period of anti-communist army dictatorship?

After I pitched this guide in late 2017, I made the case that the ghosts of violent Chilly Conflict fanaticism lurked slightly below the surfaces in lots of locations, particularly within the growing world. In Brazil, I feel that thesis has been confirmed way more proper than I ever would have preferred to see. Bolsonaro is not only haunted by these ghosts, he is the full resurrection.



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Stanley Ho, On line casino Kingpin of Playing Capital Macau, Dies at 98



Stanley Ho, who grew to become just about synonymous with Macau’s on line casino business as he drove its rise to change into the world’s playing capital, has died. He was 98 years previous.

Mr. Ho constructed the previous Portuguese colony right into a playing powerhouse that simply surpassed Las Vegas and ran a on line casino monopoly there for 4 a long time till the territory’s new Chinese language rulers ended it in 2002.

His…



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China’s Navy Chief in Hong Kong Vows to Shield Beijing’s Pursuits


The top of China’s navy garrison in Hong Kong stated his troopers would safeguard the nation’s national-security pursuits within the metropolis, reinforcing an aggressive push by the Communist Get together to tighten its grip on the previous British colony.

Beijing signaled final week that it meant to unilaterally impose new national-security legal guidelines on Hong Kong to punish sedition, subversion, terrorism and interference by international forces. The transfer triggered new protests on Sunday in a metropolis that has seen widespread demonstrations towards…



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Joe Biden, Sporting Masks, Seems in Public at a Veterans Memorial


He and his spouse, Jill Biden, sporting black masks, laid a wreath of white flowers in a Memorial Day commemoration that had not been publicly introduced earlier than the journey. Mr. Biden, a working towards Catholic, made the signal of the cross.

“Thanks to your service,” Mr. Biden mentioned, saluting a small group of veterans and different onlookers from a distance as he walked out.

Mr. Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee and former vice chairman, reduce a pointy visible distinction with President Trump, who has typically declined to put on a masks in public regardless of federal well being suggestions, a posture he maintained once more on Monday.

Mr. Trump participated in two Memorial Day occasions, first attending a wreath-laying ceremony on the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington Nationwide Cemetery. He didn’t put on a masks on the occasion.

A short while later, a maskless Mr. Trump traveled with the primary girl, Melania Trump, to the Fort McHenry Nationwide Monument and Historic Shrine in Baltimore, the place a stay-at-home order remains to be in impact to fight the unfold of the virus. The mayor, Bernard C. Younger, had urged the president to cancel the go to.

Mr. Trump nonetheless made the transient helicopter journey to the monument, the place he spoke of the sacrifice of troopers and described present service members as being “on the entrance traces of our conflict towards this horrible virus.”

Mrs. Trump and two senior officers touring with Mr. Trump — the White Home chief of employees, Mark Meadows, and the nationwide safety adviser, Robert C. O’Brien — additionally didn’t put on masks.

Supporters of Mr. Trump, a lot of whom had no masks, waved American flags and chanted “U.S.A., U.S.A.” as he arrived in Baltimore. Protesters urged the president to remain residence.

On Monday, Mr. Biden, too, spoke about navy sacrifice, a matter he typically discusses in private phrases.

The Bidens’ elder son, Beau Biden, served within the Iraq conflict, and Mr. Biden often concludes speeches with the phrase, “Could God shield our troops.” Beau Biden, the previous lawyer basic of Delaware, died of brain cancer 5 years in the past this week.

“Always remember the sacrifices that these women and men made,” Mr. Biden mentioned on Monday, based on a pool report from his go to to Veterans Memorial Park on the Delaware Memorial Bridge in New Citadel, Del. “By no means, ever neglect.”

Some Democrats, together with some shut allies, have grown impatient to see Mr. Biden publicly depart his Wilmington, Del., residence and discover methods to attach with voters, even within the period of social distancing. For the reason that pandemic hit, he has held digital rallies and made information media appearances from his basement and elsewhere in his home, however some Democrats have fearful that with out public occasions, it’s troublesome to drive a proactive message. Mr. Trump has the bully pulpit of the presidency and Mr. Biden has at occasions struggled to break through.

“It feels good to be out of my home,” Mr. Biden mentioned Monday, based on the pool report.

Requested whether or not his Memorial Day outing signaled the start of extra public appearances, his marketing campaign launched an announcement emphasizing the actual significance of Monday’s vacation through the disaster — “it’s extra crucial than ever that we honor and keep in mind the veterans, and their households, who sacrificed all the things for this nation” — with out addressing Mr. Biden’s future plans.

Mr. Biden, 77, and his marketing campaign advisers have said they intend to abide by the general public security suggestions which have, to date, made rallies and different marketing campaign occasions not possible. They and different allies have cited issues for the well being of everybody who would possibly attend such an occasion — together with the candidate — and have indicated that they wish to function position fashions who respect the science behind the suggestions. To some Biden allies, it’s one other probability for an implicit distinction with Mr. Trump, 73, who has pushed for fast re-openings of, for instance, houses of worship and has resisted sporting face masks.

Mr. Trump wore one throughout a go to to a Ford manufacturing plant in Michigan final week, however took it off earlier than speaking to reporters to keep away from being photographed sporting it.

On Monday night, Mr. Trump retweeted a post by Brit Hume of Fox Information that confirmed {a photograph} of Mr. Biden along with his face masking and mentioned, “This would possibly assist clarify why Trump doesn’t prefer to put on a masks in public.”

All 50 states have begun lifting at least some restrictions, however to extensively various levels. Republicans are hoping to run on a message of an financial comeback — even amid devastating unemployment numbers — whereas additionally delivering scathing private assaults on Mr. Biden, together with from Mr. Trump.

The Biden marketing campaign is searching for methods to drive a message of expertise and a gradual hand in a second of disaster, although generally Mr. Biden knocks himself off message. He’s holding extra digital occasions aimed toward battleground states, and over the weekend, the marketing campaign shortly seized on the information that Mr. Trump had gone golfing to create a video that attracted important consideration on-line.

“Almost 100,000 People have died,” learn textual content displayed on the video. “The loss of life toll remains to be rising. The President is taking part in golf.”

Additionally Monday, the Bidens launched a video to commemorate Memorial Day, an indication of the persevering with digital marketing campaign and a far cry from the parades and in-person ceremonies typically held all through the nation on the vacation.

“This yr, Memorial Day feels a little bit totally different,” Mr. Biden mentioned in the video. He informed those that had misplaced family members in navy service: “Thanks. We owe you. We are able to by no means reduce the magnitude of your loss. However this I can promise you: We’ll always remember.”

Mr. Trump, who delivered in-person remarks, mentioned in Maryland: “Immediately, we honor the heroes we have now misplaced. We pray for the family members they left behind. And with God as our witness, we renew our vow to like and shield and cherish this land they gave all the things to defend.”

Johnny Diaz contributed reporting.





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‘I Can’t Breathe’: four Police Officers Fired After Black Man Dies in Minneapolis


The F.B.I. and Minnesota legislation enforcement authorities are investigating the arrest of a black man who died after being handcuffed and pinned to the bottom by an officer’s knee, in an episode that was recorded on video by a bystander and denounced by the mayor of Minneapolis on Tuesday.

After the stunning video circulated broadly on social media, the mayor mentioned within the afternoon that 4 cops had been fired.

The arrest came about on Monday night, the Minneapolis Police Division mentioned in an announcement, after officers responded to a name a couple of man suspected of forgery. The police mentioned the person, believed to be in his 40s, was discovered sitting on prime of a blue automobile and “seemed to be underneath the affect.”

“He was ordered to step from his automobile,” the division’s assertion mentioned. “After he obtained out, he bodily resisted officers. Officers have been capable of get the suspect into handcuffs and famous he seemed to be struggling medical misery.”

The assertion mentioned that officers referred to as for an ambulance and that the person was taken to Hennepin County Medical Heart, “the place he died a short while later.”

On Tuesday morning, with out referring to the video recorded by a bystander, the police updated a statement, titled “Man Dies After Medical Incident Throughout Police Interplay,” that mentioned that extra info had “been made out there” and that the F.B.I. was becoming a member of the investigation.

On Tuesday afternoon, Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis tweeted that the 4 responding officers concerned within the case had been terminated. “That is the best name,” he mentioned.

The bystander video reveals a white Minneapolis police officer urgent his knee right into a black man’s neck throughout an arrest, as the person repeatedly says “I can’t breathe” and “please, I can’t breathe.”

Because the video unfold on social media on Monday night time, the arrest rapidly drew comparisons to the case of Eric Garner, an unarmed black man who died in New York Police custody in 2014, after an officer held him in a chokehold. Mr. Garner’s repeated plea of “I can’t breathe” — additionally recorded by a cellphone — grew to become a rallying cry at demonstrations in opposition to police misconduct across the nation.

“Being black in America shouldn’t be a dying sentence,” Mayor Frey mentioned in a statement on Tuesday. “For 5 minutes, we watched a white officer press his knee right into a black man’s neck. 5 minutes.”

The video recorded in Minneapolis reveals that, after a couple of minutes, the person, mendacity face down on the street together with his arms cuffed behind his again, turns into silent and immobile; the officer continues to pin the person to the pavement together with his knee.

Bystanders plead and curse, begging the officer to cease and telling him the person’s nostril is bleeding. One other officer faces the individuals gathered on the sidewalk. An ambulance medic arrives and, reaching underneath the officer’s knee, feels for a pulse on the person’s neck.

The medic turns away, and a stretcher is wheeled over. The arrested man is then rolled onto the stretcher, loaded into an ambulance and brought away.

The video didn’t present what occurred earlier than the officer pinned the person to the bottom by his neck. Chief Medaria Arradondo of the Minneapolis police mentioned at a information convention on Tuesday that he had obtained info the night time earlier than that he “deemed essential to contact the particular agent in command of the Minneapolis bureau of the F.B.I.”

He mentioned he requested the company to analyze and declined to touch upon what info he had obtained.

The F.B.I. is conducting a federal civil rights investigation, the Minnesota Bureau of Felony Apprehension mentioned in an announcement. The state bureau additionally mentioned that it was conducting its personal investigation on the request of the Police Division, and that it could launch its findings to the Hennepin County district lawyer’s workplace.

The identify of the person will probably be launched by the county medical expert’s workplace after his household has been notified and the post-mortem is accomplished, it mentioned. The names of the officers could be launched after interviews, it added.

Senator Amy Klobuchar, Democrat of Minnesota, referred to as in an announcement for a “full and thorough” investigation into the encounter, which she described as “one other horrifying and gut-wrenching occasion of an African-American man dying.”

In a separate assertion, John Gordon, government director of the ACLU of Minnesota, mentioned, “The systemic concentrating on of and use of pointless drive in opposition to individuals of colour is woven into the material of our legislation enforcement establishments and stems from the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow on this nation.”

The “horrifying video” underscores the rapid want for a radical, truthful and clear investigation into the case, he mentioned, and “the officers concerned — not simply the perpetrator, but additionally those that stood by and did nothing — have to be held accountable.”

Related high-profile instances have generated massive protests and given rise to a nationwide debate over police conduct towards black individuals, together with in 2016 after an African-American man, Philando Castile, was shot dead by a police officer at a site visitors cease in a suburb of St. Paul, Minn. The officer, Jeronimo Yanez, was later acquitted of second-degree manslaughter and of endangering security by discharging a firearm within the taking pictures.

“For those who’re unhappy, I get it. For those who’re indignant, that makes full sense. For those who really feel the necessity to protest, in fact, we wish to make it possible for individuals are capable of categorical themselves,” Mayor Frey mentioned on the information convention Tuesday, with a reminder in regards to the dangers of the coronavirus.

He described the occasion on Monday night time as “terrible” and “traumatic.”

“If you hear somebody calling for assist, you’re supposed to assist,” he mentioned. “This officer failed in probably the most fundamental, human sense. All I hold coming again to is that this: This man mustn’t have died.”

The Police Division’s assertion mentioned that no weapons have been used and that the officers’ physique cameras have been recording. Mr. Frey mentioned that he had seen the video “taken and posted by a civilian” however not the physique digital camera footage.

“Regardless of the investigation reveals, it doesn’t change the straightforward reality: He ought to nonetheless be with us this morning,” the mayor mentioned. “I imagine what I noticed and what I noticed is unsuitable on each degree.”

Derrick Bryson Taylor contributed reporting.





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‘I Can’t Breathe’: Black Man Dies After Being Pinned by Police Officer


The F.B.I. and Minnesota legislation enforcement authorities are investigating the arrest of a black man who died after being handcuffed and pinned to the bottom by an officer’s knee, in an episode that was filmed by a bystander and denounced by the mayor of Minneapolis on Tuesday.

After the stunning video circulated extensively on social media, the mayor mentioned within the afternoon that 4 law enforcement officials had been fired.

The arrest passed off on Monday night, the Minneapolis Police Division mentioned in a press release, after officers responded to a name a couple of man suspected of forgery. The police mentioned the person, believed to be in his 40s, was discovered sitting on high of a blue automotive and “seemed to be below the affect.”

“He was ordered to step from his automotive,” the division’s assertion mentioned. “After he obtained out, he bodily resisted officers. Officers had been in a position to get the suspect into handcuffs and famous he seemed to be struggling medical misery.”

The assertion mentioned that officers referred to as for an ambulance and that the person was taken to Hennepin County Medical Heart, “the place he died a short while later.”

On Tuesday morning, with out referring to the video recorded by a bystander, the police updated a statement, titled “Man Dies After Medical Incident Throughout Police Interplay,” that mentioned that further info had “been made out there” and that the F.B.I. was becoming a member of the investigation.

On Tuesday afternoon, Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis tweeted that the 4 responding officers concerned within the case had been terminated. “That is the correct name,” he mentioned.

The bystander video exhibits a white Minneapolis police officer urgent his knee right into a black man’s neck throughout an arrest, as the person repeatedly says “I can’t breathe” and “please, I can’t breathe.”

Because the video unfold on social media on Monday night time, the arrest shortly drew comparisons to the case of Eric Garner, an unarmed black man who died in New York Police custody in 2014, after an officer held him in a chokehold. Mr. Garner’s repeated plea of “I can’t breathe” — additionally recorded by a cellphone — turned a rallying cry at demonstrations in opposition to police misconduct across the nation.

“Being black in America shouldn’t be a loss of life sentence,” Mayor Frey mentioned in a statement on Tuesday. “For 5 minutes, we watched a white officer press his knee right into a black man’s neck. 5 minutes.”

The video recorded in Minneapolis exhibits that, after a couple of minutes, the person, mendacity face down on the street together with his fingers cuffed behind his again, turns into silent and immobile; the officer continues to pin the person to the pavement together with his knee.

Bystanders plead and curse, begging the officer to cease and telling him the person’s nostril is bleeding. One other officer faces the individuals gathered on the sidewalk. An ambulance medic arrives and, reaching below the officer’s knee, feels for a pulse on the person’s neck.

The medic turns away, and a stretcher is wheeled over. The arrested man is then rolled onto the stretcher, loaded into an ambulance and brought away.

The video didn’t present what occurred earlier than the officer pinned the person to the bottom by his neck. Chief Medaria Arradondo of the Minneapolis police mentioned at a information convention on Tuesday that he had obtained info the night time earlier than that he “deemed essential to contact the particular agent in command of the Minneapolis bureau of the F.B.I.”

He mentioned he requested the company to analyze and declined to touch upon what info he had obtained.

The F.B.I. is conducting a federal civil rights investigation, the Minnesota Bureau of Felony Apprehension mentioned in a press release. The state bureau additionally mentioned that it was conducting its personal investigation on the request of the Police Division, and that it might launch its findings to the Hennepin County district legal professional’s workplace.

The identify of the person will likely be launched by the county health worker’s workplace after his household has been notified and the post-mortem is accomplished, it mentioned. The names of the officers can be launched after interviews, it added.

Senator Amy Klobuchar, Democrat of Minnesota, referred to as in a press release for a “full and thorough” investigation into the encounter, which she described as “one other horrifying and gut-wrenching occasion of an African-American man dying.”

In a separate assertion, John Gordon, government director of the ACLU of Minnesota, mentioned, “The systemic concentrating on of and use of pointless pressure in opposition to individuals of coloration is woven into the material of our legislation enforcement establishments and stems from the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow on this nation.”

The “horrifying video” underscores the quick want for a radical, honest and clear investigation into the case, he mentioned, and “the officers concerned — not simply the perpetrator, but additionally those that stood by and did nothing — have to be held accountable.”

Related high-profile circumstances have generated massive protests and given rise to a nationwide debate over police conduct towards black individuals, together with in 2016 after an African-American man, Philando Castile, was shot dead by a police officer at a visitors cease in a suburb of St. Paul, Minn. The officer, Jeronimo Yanez, was later acquitted of second-degree manslaughter and of endangering security by discharging a firearm within the capturing.

“Should you’re unhappy, I get it. Should you’re indignant, that makes full sense. Should you really feel the necessity to protest, in fact, we need to guarantee that persons are in a position to specific themselves,” Mayor Frey mentioned on the information convention Tuesday, with a reminder concerning the dangers of the coronavirus.

He described the occasion on Monday night time as “terrible” and “traumatic.”

“If you hear somebody calling for assist, you’re supposed to assist,” he mentioned. “This officer failed in probably the most fundamental, human sense. All I hold coming again to is that this: This man shouldn’t have died.”

The Police Division’s assertion mentioned that no weapons had been used and that the officers’ physique cameras had been recording. Mr. Frey mentioned that he had seen the video “taken and posted by a civilian” however not the physique digital camera footage.

“Regardless of the investigation reveals, it doesn’t change the easy reality: He ought to nonetheless be with us this morning,” the mayor mentioned. “I consider what I noticed and what I noticed is flawed on each degree.”





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Borussia Dortmund 0-1 Bayern Munich: Joshua Kimmich sends leaders seven factors clear


Bayern Munich’s purpose got here from Joshua Kimmich simply earlier than half-time

Leaders Bayern Munich took an enormous step to retaining their Bundesliga title by successful away from dwelling at second-placed Borussia Dortmund.

Joshua Kimmich’s great chip from 20 yards gave Bayern the lead simply earlier than half-time after either side had efforts cleared off the road.

Dortmund introduced on England’s Jadon Sancho within the second half, however he couldn’t encourage a fightback from his facet.

Bayern’s win places them seven factors away from Dortmund with six video games left.

Robert Lewandowski almost doubled Bayern’s benefit late on however shot in opposition to the publish. Minutes later, he and the remainder of the Bayern gamers had been celebrating what may show to be an enormous three factors within the title race.

Resolute Bayern do sufficient to win

Earlier than the sport the build-up targeted on Lewandowski and Dortmund’s Erling Braut Haaland, with each strikers having scored 41 objectives in 35 home video games this season – placing them stage as high goalscorers in Europe.

Haaland almost acquired his 42nd home purpose of the marketing campaign contained in the opening 35 seconds when he shot by the legs of Bayern goalkeeper Manuel Neuer – making his 400th Bundesliga look – however Jerome Boateng was effectively positioned to hack the ball off the road.

Dortmund then had the ball within the internet when Thorgan Hazard headed in, however an offside earlier within the transfer dominated the trouble out.

Bayern acquired extra concerned within the recreation and had a lot of probabilities. Serge Gnabry had an try backheeled off the road by the retreating Lukasz Piszczek earlier than Kingsley Coman and Leon Goretzka had been each denied by dwelling goalkeeper Roman Burki.

Nonetheless, Burki will probably be sad that he couldn’t preserve out Kimmich’s lofted effort simply earlier than the break because the Switzerland worldwide acquired his hand to the ball nevertheless it nonetheless went in.

Dortmund, regardless of the introduction of Sancho at half-time, struggled to create clear-cut probabilities within the second half and Haaland was changed by Giovanni Reyna with 18 minutes remaining.

However the dwelling facet had an opportunity to seize an equaliser when Raphael Guerreiro had a free-kick simply outdoors the penalty space however may solely shoot straight at Neuer. Mahmoud Dahoud additionally had a late effort saved by Neuer on a irritating afternoon for the hosts.

Bayern closing in on eight in a row

Dortmund, below the steerage of now-Liverpool supervisor Jurgen Klopp, received the Bundesliga in 2010-11 and once more the next season in 2011-12 however Bayern have received the title yearly since.

They’re now in pole place for his or her eighth successive title, which they’ll safe in the event that they win 4 of their last six matches.

This outcome continued a exceptional unbeaten run in all competitions that now stretches to 18 matches since they misplaced 2-1 at Borussia Monchengladbach on 7 December.

Bayern, who’re additionally within the semi-finals of the German Cup and maintain a 3-Zero benefit over Chelsea after the primary leg of their Champions League last-16 tie, have now received 21 of the 24 matches since Hansi Flick moved up from assistant to exchange the sacked Niko Kovac in November – when Bayern had been fourth within the desk.

Earlier than the match, dubbed Der Klassiker and performed in entrance of no spectators at Sign Iduna Park due to coronavirus restrictions, he mentioned: “Whatever the outcome, nothing will probably be determined.”

Nonetheless, Kimmich’s purpose means Bayern have a commanding grip on the Bundesliga and one other title is theirs to lose.

Man of the match – Joshua Kimmich (Bayern Munich)

Joshua Kimmich (quantity 32) has scored 5 objectives in all competitions this season, with this being his third within the Bundesliga

Identical to Guardiola – the stats

  • Flick has received 15 of his first 18 Bundesliga video games in control of Bayern Munich. The one different supervisor to try this was Pep Guardiola.
  • Kimmich has scored three Bundesliga objectives this season from outdoors the penalty space, greater than every other Bayern participant.
  • Neuer was making his 400th Bundesliga look. Since his debut (matchday two 2006-07), no participant has performed as many Bundesliga video games as him.

‘We now have to hope they slip up thrice’ – what they mentioned

Borussia Dortmund coach Lucien Favre: “It will likely be very, very troublesome. Seven factors in six video games. It will likely be brutally troublesome.”

Dortmund defender Mats Hummels: “I feel now it’s only as much as Bayern to determine the title.

“We’re seven factors behind and might do nothing greater than win our video games. However we now have to hope they slip up thrice. We all know how good they’re.”

Bayern Munich coach Hansi Flick: “I do not dwell sooner or later the right here and now’s necessary.

“We wished to win and take an enormous step ahead – we did that. We had been targeted, decisive and brave at occasions. I am happy with my crew.”

Bayern goalscorer Joshua Kimmich: “It was perhaps probably the most lovely purpose of my life and in addition crucial.

“I did not see him off his line however we had been instructed earlier than the sport that Burki stands a bit off his line so I went for it and optimistically it went in.”

Bayern midfielder Thomas Muller: “That was the large step that we wished to take. It was a little bit of an odd recreation however after Joshua’s purpose we tried to work lots. It was necessary to win right here in Dortmund.”

What’s subsequent?

Bayern Munich entertain relegation-threatened Fortuna Dusseldorf at dwelling on Saturday, earlier than Borussia Dortmund play the next day – away at bottom-of-the-table Paderborn.





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